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Sexually Transmitted Infections 101

Are you at risk for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)?

  • Are you currently in a relationship in which neither you nor your partner(s) have been tested for STIs?
  • Have you had any form of sex without using barriers (condoms, dental dams, internal condoms, etc.)
  • Have you had sex with someone who has had sex with someone other than you?
  • Are you a man who has sex with other men?

If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you should be tested for STIs. You can call 1-800-332-2437 or visit your local health department for more information or use the tool bar on the right. Additional information about transmission, symptoms, and testing, and more can be found below.

STI Information

Click each drop down to learn information about the different STIs.

Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)

Bacterial Vaginosis is the most common vaginal infection. It happens when there is an imbalance in the bacteria that typically lives within the vagina.

How is BV transmitted?

Doctors don't fully understand how people get BV. The disease may spread between women who have sex with women. A person with a vagina can get BV, but you're at higher risk of getting it if:

  • You have a new sex partner or multiple sex partners
  • You use an intrauterine device (IUD) for birth control
  • You douche

People with vaginas do not get BV from toilet seats, bedding, swimming pools, or by touching objects around them. People with vaginas who have never had sex rarely get BV.

What are the symptoms of BV?

  • Unusual thin white or gray vaginal discharge
  • Pain, itching, or burning in the vagina, a strong fish-like odor, especially after sex
  • Burning when urinating
  • Itching around the outside of the vagina

How is BV diagnosed?

A doctor must examine you and take a sample of fluid from your vagina to determine if you have BV. You should be tested for BV if you have any symptoms (like a vaginal discharge) or if your sex partner has BV or symptoms that could be BV.

How is BV treated?

  • BV can be treated and cured with oral or topical antibiotics.
  • Finish all your medicine to make sure you are cured.
  • Do not share your medicine with anyone. You need all of it.
  • If you still have symptoms after treatment, go back to see your doctor.

If left untreated, you may have a higher risk of getting another STI or HIV.

How can BV be prevented?

  • Do not douche.
  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex.
  • Avoid using deodorants or perfumed products in and around the vaginal area.
  • Change tampons and pads frequently.
  • Ensure you wipe from front to back after going to the bathroom.

For more, printable information about BV, see the CDC's brochure.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common STI that can infect any sexually active person.

How is chlamydia transmitted?

Condomless vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone with chlamydia. If your sex partner has a penis, you can still get chlamydia even if they do not ejaculate (cum). Chlamydia can be transmitted during pregnancy and exposed infants can be born prematurely, be at decreased size and weight, and develop eye and lung infections after delivery.

What are the symptoms of chlamydia?

Most people have no symptoms at all. But some may experience:

  • Burning when urinating
  • An abnormal genital discharge
  • Pain or swelling of one or both testicles
  • Rectal pain
  • Rectal discharge
  • Rectal bleeding

How is chlamydia diagnosed?

A urine sample is used to determine infection in genital area. Swabbing of the throat, cervix, or rectum can also be performed for testing.

How is chlamydia treated?

  • Chlamydia can be treated and cured with oral antibiotics.
  • Finish all your medication to be sure you are cured.
  • Do not share your medication with anyone. You need all of it.
  • Make sure your sex partners are also treated and cured to ensure you are not re-infected.
  • Wait 7 days after the last dose of treatment to have sex again.
  • Get tested again about 3 months after treatment.

If left untreated, it can cause permanent damage to the reproductive system, infertility, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID), and fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy that occurs outside of the womb).

How can chlamydia be prevented?

  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex.
  • Get tested before and after every new sexual partner.
  • Talk to your partner(s) about when they were last tested.

Complicated chlamydial infections are infections that spread to the upper genital tract and cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) in people with vaginas, epididymitis (redness and swelling of the testes) in people with penises, and sexually acquired reactive arthritis (Reiter's syndrome). 

For more, printable information about chlamydia, see the CDC's brochure.

Crabs (Pubic Lice)

Pubic lice or "crabs" are parasitic insects found primarily in the pubic or genital region of humans. Anyone can get pubic lice. They can occasionally be found in other course body hairs on the body including the legs, armpits, mustache, beard, eyebrows, or eyelashes. Lice found on the head are generally head lice, not pubic lice. Animals do not get or spread crabs.

How are crabs transmitted?

  • Sexual contact (crabs found on children may be a sign of sexual exposure or abuse)
  • Close personal contact 
  • Contact with articles of clothing, bed linens, or towels that have been used by someone with crabs

Crabs cannot be easily spread by sitting on a toilet seat.

What are the symptoms of crabs?

  • Itching in the genital area
  • Visible nits (lice eggs) or crawling lice in the pubic area

How are crabs diagnosed?

Healthcare providers will look for pubic lice and nits on pubic hair or other course hair parts on the body. They can be observed with the naked eye, but providers may use a magnifying lens to find lice or eggs.

How are crabs treated?

Crabs can be treated with a lice-killing lotion or mousse. These products are available over the counter and without a prescription at drug stores or pharmacies. Lidane shampoo is a prescription medication that can kill lice and lice eggs, but it is not recommended unless the lotion or mousse fail to treat the problem.

How can crabs be prevented?

  • Talk to sex partners about risk and any potential symptoms.
  • Do not have sex with someone with an active infestation until they have been treated.
  • Machine wash and dry clothing and bedding used by someone who is infested.
  • Do not share clothing, bedding, and towels used by an infested person.

Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea is a common STI that can infect any sexually active person. It causes infections in the genitals, rectum, and throat.

How is gonorrhea transmitted? 

Condomless vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Gonorrhea can be transmitted during pregnancy and vaginal birth. Exposed infants can be born prematurely, be at decreased size and weight, or develop eye infections after delivery.

What are the symptoms of gonorrhea?

Some people have no symptoms at all and sometimes symptoms in people with vaginas may be mistaken for a bladder or vaginal infection. Some people with gonorrhea may experience:

  • Pain or burning when urinating
  • White, yellow, or green discharge from the penis
  • Painful or swollen testicles
  • Increased vaginal discharge
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods
  • Rectal discharge
  • Anal itching
  • Anal soreness
  • Anal bleeding
  • Painful bowel movements
  • Sore throat

How is gonorrhea diagnosed?

A urine sample is used to determine infection in genital area. Swabbing of the throat, cervix, urethra (people with penises), or rectum can also be performed for testing.

How is gonorrhea treated?

  • Gonorrhea can be treated and cured with oral antibiotics.
  • Finish all of your medicine to be sure you are cured.
  • Do not share your medication with anyone. You need all of it.
  • Make sure your sex partners are also treated and cured to ensure you are not re-infected.
  • Wait 7 days after the last dose of treatment to have sex again.
  • If your symptoms continue for more than a few days after treatment, get tested again. Antibiotic resistant gonorrhea is on the rise.

Gonorrhea is becoming increasingly more resistant to the antibiotics used to treat the infection. It is now more important than ever to complete all medication used to treat gonorrhea to help slow and prevent antibiotic resistance. 

If left untreated, gonorrhea can cause permanent damage to the reproductive system, PID, long-term pelvic/abdominal pain, infertility, and fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy that occurs outside of the womb).

Disseminated Gonococcal Infection (DGI) is rare, but it happens when the bacteria that causes gonorrhea is left untreated and spreads to places in the body other than the genitals, throat, or rectum. It can cause skin lesions, arthritis and joint pain, blood infection leading to flu-like symptoms, and on rare occasions, endocarditis and meningitis.

How can gonorrhea be prevented?

  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex.
  • Get tested before and after every new sexual partner.
  • Talk to your partner about when they were last tested.

For more, printable information about gonorrhea, see the CDC's brochure.

Herpes

Herpes is a common STI that any sexually active person can get. It has two types: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 primarily causes oral herpes (commonly known as a "cold sore") and people may be infected during childhood or young adulthood from non-sexual contact with saliva. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can infect either the oral or genital regions and having one form of herpes does not mean you will get the other.

How is herpes transmitted?

If you do not have herpes, you can get infected if you come in contact with the herpes virus via:

  • A herpes sore
  • Saliva (if your partner has an oral herpes infection) or genital secretions (if your partner has a genital herpes infection)
  • Skin in the oral area if your partner has an oral herpes infection or skin in the genital area if your partner has a genital herpes infection

Transmission can occur without visible sores and an oral infection can be transmitted to the genital region during oral sex. You cannot get herpes from toilet seats, bedding, swimming pools, or by touching everyday objects such as silverware, soap, or towels. Transmission during pregnancy or delivery is rare, but it can have serious complications for infants such as brain damage, breathing problems, and seizures.

What are the symptoms of herpes? 

Most people have no symptoms. Some may have mild symptoms that can be mistaken for ingrown hairs or pimples. Other symptoms may include:

  • Painful blisters with clear fluid inside appearing on or around the genitals, rectum, or mouth. Blisters break and leave painful sores that take a week or more to heal. This is referred to as having an outbreak. Over time, especially with an HSV-2 infection, outbreaks may decrease in duration or frequency over time
  • People experiencing their first outbreak may also have flu-like symptoms (fever, body aches, or swollen glands)

How is herpes diagnosed?

A health care provider may diagnose herpes through observation of symptoms during an outbreak or by taking a sample (swab) from one of the sores to test it. If you suspect you have herpes, a blood test may also be performed, but it cannot tell you who gave you the infection or how long you have been infected. Testing for herpes is not part of a routine STI exam.

How is herpes treated?

  • Herpes can be treated, but not cured.
  • Medication can prevent or shorten outbreaks.
  • Daily medication can make you less likely to pass the infection to your sex partner(s).

How can herpes be prevented?

  • Use condoms and barriers each time you have sex. Condoms don't completely eliminate risk since herpes transmission can happen with skin that is not covered by a condom, but they do help reduce risk.
  • If you're engaging in sex with someone who has herpes, you can lower your risk by discussing with your partner if they take anti-herpes medication daily and you avoid having sex with your partner when they are experiencing an outbreak.

For more, printable information about herpes, see the CDC's brochure.

HIV and AIDS

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that attacks the body's immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, often called T-cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body cannot fight off infections and disease. When a person's immune system is very weak due to a low number of T-cells, it may be diagnosed as an advanced form of HIV called Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). 

How is HIV transmitted?

Unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex and needle or syringe sharing with someone living with HIV. Blood, breast milk, vaginal secretions, semen, pre-cum, and rectal fluids can carry the virus. Transmission to infants can also occur during pregnancy or delivery as well as when breast/chest feeding; with medical care or treatment, people living with HIV can give birth to and breast/chest feed infants without transmitting HIV. You cannot get HIV from air or water, saliva, sweat, tears, or closed-mouth kissing, insects or pets, or by sharing drinks, food, or toilets.

What are the symptoms of HIV?

HIV has stages and the symptoms during those stages vary. 

  • Early infection (2-4 weeks after infection): Flu-like symptoms that may last for a few weeks (chills, fever, body aches, etc.)
  • Latent stage (can be a decade or longer): No symptoms during this time
  • Advanced infection (AIDS):
    • Opportunistic infections occur (kaposi sarcoma, pneumocystis, jirovecii pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus retinitis, etc.)
    • Chills
    • Fever
    • Sweats
    • Swollen lymph glands
    • Weakness
    • Weight loss

How is HIV diagnosed?

A simple finger prick can be used to determine infection. Results are ready in minutes. Tests can be done at testing locations, with your doctor, or at home test kits can be acquired from pharmacies or for free from the Ohio STI/HIV Hotline

How is HIV treated?

  • HIV cannot be cured, but it can be treated with medication (Antiretroviral Therapy, ART).
  • Taking medication as prescribed makes viral loads undetectable, which means a person living with HIV cannot transmit the virus to others.

How can HIV be prevented?

  • Use condoms and barriers each time you have sex
  • Ask your partners about the last time they were tested and if they have had unprotected sex since that time
  • Get tested before and after every new sexual partner
  • Avoid sharing needles and other equipment (cookers, spoons, filters, water, etc.) used to mix or inject drugs
  • Take Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) (Once daily pill that lowers HIV risk by up to 99%. More information can be found here including where to get it)
  • Take Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) (Medication to prevent you from getting HIV after you may have been exposed within 72 hours. More information can be found here and you can use the widget on the right of the page to find where to get PEP) if you believe you have been exposed

For more, printable information about HIV/AIDS, see the CDC's fact sheet and OHIV.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)/Genital Warts

Human Papillomavirus is the most common STI. There are many different types and most are harmless and go away on their own, but some types can lead to warts and cancer. 

How is HPV transmitted? 

You can get HPV by having condomless vaginal, anal, or oral sex. HPV can be passed on even when the person with the infection does not have any signs or symptoms. It can be spread through skin to skin contact so penetrative sex does not have to happen for you to get it.

What are the symptoms of HPV?

Symptoms can develop years after initial infection. It may then be hard to know when you were first infected. It often goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when it does not go away, it can cause symptoms or conditions:Not all of the strains of HPV cause warts or symptoms.

  • Genital warts that look like small bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower
  • Pre-cancerous cells on the cervix
  • Cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, throat, and anus

How is HPV diagnosed? 

There is no test to find out a person's "HPV status." When signs of HPV are observed by a health care provider such as an abnormal Pap test result (anal or cervical), genital warts, or cancers, the health care provider may attribute that to HPV infection. 

How is HPV treated?

There is no treatment for the virus itself, but there are treatments for the symptoms it can cause. Genital warts can be treated with prescription medication. Cervical pre-cancers can be treated after being identified during a Pap test. Other HPV-related cancers can be treated as well especially if diagnosed early.

How can HPV be prevented?

  • Get vaccinated against HPV (More information about the vaccine and when people should get it can be found here)
  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex *Be aware that contact with skin not covered by barriers may still result in infection even without visible symptoms*

For more, printable information about HPV, see the CDC's brochure.

Mycoplasma genitalium (M. gen)

M. gen is an infection that can cause cervicitis, male urethritis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID), and possibly infertility. In pregnancy, m gen has been associated with premature birth, miscarriage, and stillbirth.

How is M. gen transmitted?

You can get M. gen by having condomless vaginal, anal, or oral sex.

What are the symptoms of M. gen?

Some people have no symptoms at all. Some people may experience:

  • Abnormal discharge
  • Pelvic pain
  • Irritation and pain in the urethra
  • Bleeding after intercourse
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods
  • Pain on urination
  • Pain and swelling of the testicles

How is M. gen diagnosed?

A urine sample is used to determine infection. Swabbing of the cervix, urethra (people with penises), or rectum can also be performed for testing.

How is M. gen treated?

  • M. gen can be treated and cured with oral antibiotics.
  • Finish all of your medicine to be sure you are cured.
  • Do not share your medication with anyone. You need all of it.
  • Make sure your sex partners are also treated and cured to ensure you are not re-infected.
  • Wait 7 days after the last dose of treatment to have sex again.
  • If your symptoms continue for more than a few days after treatment, get tested again. Antibiotic resistant gonorrhea is on the rise.

M. gen is becoming increasingly more resistant to the antibiotics used to treat the infection. It is now more important than ever to complete all medication used to treat M gen to help slow and prevent antibiotic resistance. 

If left untreated, M gen can cause permanent damage to the reproductive system, PID, long-term pelvic/abdominal pain, infertility, and fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy that occurs outside of the womb).

How can M. gen be prevented?

  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex.

Syphilis

Syphilis is an STI that can cause serious health problems especially in the later stages. The infection can be cured, but the damage done to the body due to the infection cannot be cured.

How is syphilis transmitted? 

Direct contact with syphilis sore, called a chancre, during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chancres can be on skin on or around the external genitals as well as inside the vagina, mouth, rectum, or around the anus. Syphilis can be transmitted during pregnancy and it can cause premature births, stillbirths, and death shortly after birth.

What are the symptoms of syphilis?

Syphilis has stages and the symptoms of those stages vary. The symptoms can often be mistaken for other conditions due to being so broad; syphilis is often referred to as The Great Imitator:

  • Primary syphilis: Single or multiple firm, round, painless sores in the location where syphilis entered the body (in the vagina, on the vulva, on the anus, in the rectum, on the mouth, or in the mouth).  
  • Secondary syphilis:
    • Skin rashes and mucous membrane lesions (in the mouth, vagina, or anus). Rashes look like rough, red, or reddish-brown spots on the palms of the hands or bottoms of feet. Usually the rash will not itch and is often faint
    • Fever
    • Swollen lymph glands
    • Sore throat
    • Patchy hair loss
    • Headaches
    • Weight loss
    • Muscle aches
    • Fatigue
  • Early non-primary, non-secondary: No symptoms during this time
  • Tertiary Stage (10 to 30 years after infection): Organ system dysfunction and damage:
    • Gummas (large skin lesions)
    •  
  • Neurosyphilis (Syphilis infection in the nervous system):
    • Severe headache
    • Difficulty coordinating muscle movements
    • Paralysis (not able to move certain parts of your body)
    • Numbness
    • Dementia (mental disorder)
  • Ocular syphilis (Syphilis infection in the eyes)
    • Changes in vision
    • Blindness

How is syphilis diagnosed?

Syphilis can be diagnosed with a blood test. Some health care providers may also diagnose syphilis by collecting fluid from a sore.

How is syphilis treated? 

Syphilis, at any stage, can be treated and cured with injectable antibiotics, but the damage done to body systems in the case of tertiary syphilis is permanent.

How can syphilis be prevented?

  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex *Be aware that sores can be in areas not covered by barriers so transmission can still occur*
  • Avoid sharing needles and other equipment (cookers, spoons, filters, water, etc.) used to mix or inject drugs
  • Get tested before and after every new sexual partner

For more, printable information about syphilis, see the CDC's brochure.

Trichomoniasis (Trich)

Trichomoniasis is a very common STI that occurs when a person is infected with the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

How is trich transmitted?

Unprotected vaginal sex. The parasite is most often found in the urethra (both people with vaginas and people with penises) or vulva, vagina, or cervix. It is not common for the parasite to infect other sites such as the hands, mouth, or anus. The parasite can be passed on even if the person with the infection has no symptoms. Transmission can occur during pregnancy and infants can be born early or at low birth weights. It can also be transmitted to infants during vaginal birth. There is a slight chance of non-sexual transmission by sharing damp towels or bathwater with someone who is infected.

What are the symptoms of trich? 

Trich often does not cause symptoms, but when it does, they can occur within 5 to 28 days on infection and range in severity:

  • Itching or irritation inside the penis
  • Burning after urination or ejaculation (people with penises)
  • Discharge from penis
  • Itching, burning, redness, or soreness of the genitals (people with vaginas)
  • Discomfort on urination (people with vaginas)
  • A change in vaginal discharge (thin discharge or increased volume). Discharge can be clear, white, yellowish, or greenish with an unusual fishy smell.
  • Discomfort during sex

How is trich diagnosed?

A urine sample is used to determine infection. Swabs of the penis or vagina can also be used.

How is trich treated? 

  • Trich can be treated and cured with antibiotics.
  • Finish all your medicine to be sure you're cured.
  • Do not share your medicine with anyone. You need all of it.
  • Wait 7-10 days after being treated to begin having sex again.
  • Get checked again if symptoms come back after treatment.

How can trich be prevented?

  • Use condoms and barriers each time you have sex *Be aware that the parasite can infect areas not covered by barriers so transmission can still occur*
  • Routine testing before and after every new sexual partner

For more, printable information about trich, see the CDC's brochure.

Zika Virus

Zika is a virus that is spread primarily through mosquito bites, but it can be spread through sex and cause illness as well as negative pregnancy outcomes including miscarriage, stillbirth, and birth defects. Children exposed to Zika in utero or 

How is Zika transmitted?

  • Mosquito bites
  • In pregnant people to their fetuses
  • Unprotected vaginal, anal, and oral sex
  • Sharing of sex toys
  • Blood transfusions

If someone is infected by a mosquito bite, they can pass the virus through sex to their partner so even people in monogamous relationships can infect each other. It may be easier for people with penises to pass Zika to their partners because the virus stays in semen longer than other body fluids.

What are the symptoms of Zika?

Many people infected with Zika virus won't have symptoms. For those that do have symptoms, they can include:

  • Fever
  • Rash
  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Red eyes
  • Muscle pain

Symptoms can last a few days to a week and people usually do not require hospitalization. Death as a result of Zika is rare and once someone has been infected, they are likely protected from future infection. In infants, Zika can cause microcephaly and other birth defects.

How is Zika diagnosed?

  • A blood or urine sample can be used for diagnosis.
  • Since symptoms of Zika are similar to other illnesses, doctors may order several tests to confirm infection.
  • Diagnosis is based on test results, observation of symptoms, and a person's recent travel history.

How is Zika treated?

There is no specific medicine for Zika virus. Symptoms can be treated at home.

  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Drink fluids to prevent dehydration.
  • Take medicine such as acetaminophen to reduce fever and pain.
  • Do not take aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • If you are taking medicine for another medical condition, talk to your healthcare provider before taking additional medication.

How can Zika be prevented?

  • Wear long sleeves and pants in places with mosquitoes.
  • Use insect repellents.
  • Make sure your home has door and window screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Use condoms and other barriers each time you have sex.

Talking to Sex Partners about STIs

If you are treated for an STI, but your partner(s) is/are not, you can become re-infected with that STI. Talking to a partner about having and STI and how they may need to be tested and treated as well can be hard. Here are some different ways to do it and some resources to help.

Talking with your Sex Partners

Talking with your sex partner(s) about an STI diagnosis can be difficult, but it is the right thing to do. The best way to tell your sex partner(s) is by being open and honest. Your partner may feel surprised, upset, angry, or scared. These feelings are normal. Here are some strategies to help you feel confident before talking to them:

  • Role-playing with someone you trust or in front of a mirror
  • Choose a neutral setting and time where you won't be interrupted
  • Remember that this is not a "whodunit" mystery - it is about taking charge of your sexual health and helping your partner(s) take charge of theirs

These and other helpful strategies can be found at tellyourpartner.org

Anonymous Sex Partner Notification

Maybe talking to your partner(s) yourself is not ideal. There are many reasons people do not feel comfortable talking to their partners about an STI diagnosis, but it is still important for those partners to know that they may need to be tested and treated as well.

Tell Your Partner is a platform that allows you to send an email or text notification to your sex partners to inform them about exposure to an STI without letting them know you are the one sending it. It is safe and secure and takes less than 2 minutes to use. You can write your own message to your partner(s) or use the one they have already created for you that tells your partner the information they need to know.

Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT)

If you have been diagnosed with chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trich, you may be able to get treatment for your sex partner(s) as well as yourself. Expedited Partner Therapy is the practice of your provider giving you medications or prescriptions for up to two partners without those partners seeing your provider. The label on the prescription can simply say "Expedited Partner Therapy" and does not have to have any identifying information about your partner(s). With EPT, when you talk to your partner(s) about having an STI, you can give them the prescription or medicine at the same time. Remember, if your partner is not treated too, they can pass the STI back to you. Ask your provider if EPT is right for you and your partner(s) and for more information, visit the CDC website.

Additional Information

Do you still have questions about STIs? Here are some resources that can help:

Get Tested

Learn more information about where you can get tested, what you should be tested for based on CDC guidelines, and how frequently you should be tested. Learn where you can find free or low cost condoms and where you can find a PrEP provider for HIV prevention in your area. 

Ohio HIV and STI Hotline

The Hotline is available Monday - Friday 9am to 5pm: Live chat or call (1-800-332-2437) to discuss your questions about HIV, STIs, and sexual health. Calls or chats made outside of the available times will be answered as soon as possible.

Request condoms, lube, and/or dental dams (latex free options available) sent to you every month for free in nondescript packaging (must be at least 16 years old and live in the state of Ohio)