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Tips & Education

Tips & Education

 

Every member of the community should have a plan for what to do in the event of an overdose. Get more information on the three steps you can take that could save your life or the life of someone you love.

If You Know Someone Who Is Using:

Carry Naloxone

Naloxone, the generic form of NARCAN®, is a medication that can reverse an opioid overdose. When used during an overdose, naloxone blocks the effects of opioids on the brain and quickly restores breathing. If naloxone is given to someone who doesn’t have opioids in their system, it causes no harm. Emergency medical professionals have used naloxone for more than 40 years to save lives. Please note: Naloxone cannot be self-administered.


How to Administer Naloxone:

1. REMOVE NALOXONE FROM BOX

1. Remove naloxone from box

Peel back the tab with the circle to open the nasal spray.


2. HOLD THE NASAL SPRAY PROPERLY BEFORE USE

2. Hold the nasal spray properly before use

Place your thumb on the bottom of the plunger, and first and middle fingers on either side of the nozzle.


3. GENTLY INSERT THE TIP OF THE NOZZLE INTO EITHER NOSTRIL

3. Gently insert the tip of the nozzle into either nostril

Tilt the person’s head back and provide support under the neck with your hand. Gently insert until your fingers are against the bottom of the nose.


4. PRESS THE PLUNGER FIRMLY TO ADMINISTER NALOXONE

4. Press the plunger firmly to administer naloxone

Remove the nasal spray from the nostril after giving the dose.

Know the Signs

Due to their effect on the part of the brain that regulates breathing, opioids in high doses can cause respiratory depression and death. An opioid overdose can be identified by a combination of signs and symptoms. Understanding these signs and symptoms could help save a life.

NOT RESPONSIVE
BREATHING SLOW OR ABSENT
NOT RESPONSIVE BREATHING SLOW OR ABSENT

DISCOLORATION OF LIPS & NAILS
CHOKING OR COUGHING
DISCOLORATION OF LIPS & NAILS CHOKING OR COUGHING

COLD OR CLAMMY SKIN
PUPILS ARE EXTREMELY SMALL
COLD OR CLAMMY SKIN PUPILS ARE EXTREMELY SMALL

DIZZINESS & DISORIENTATION
DIZZINESS & DISORIENTATION 

Call 911

Call. No Matter What.

Far too many people don’t call for help when they witness an overdose. They’re afraid of being arrested when police arrive with emergency medical help. Ohio’s Good Samaritan Law is designed to remove that fear by granting varying levels of immunity for people who call 911 during an overdose.


The issue involves all of us. The solution does too.

The issue involves all of us. The solution does, too.


Ohio’s Good Samaritan Law

Ohio’s Good Samaritan Law provides immunity for minor drug possession to people seeking help during a drug overdose. You can’t be arrested or prosecuted if:

  • Law enforcement found the drugs as a result of calling 911 during an overdose.
  • You have a drug test and receive referral for treatment within 30 days.
  • You provide documentation verifying the date and time of your drug test and referral.

Immunity can be used twice. People on parole or probation are not eligible. Immunity is limited to possession of controlled substances.


What To Say When Calling 911

If someone is afraid to mention drugs or overdose or worry they won’t have immunity, they can still call 911 and simply say, “Someone is not breathing and is unresponsive. Please send an ambulance immediately.”


Stay informed about the latest laws in Ohio. Ohio’s current laws went into effect in 2016. Stay up to date on the latest by visiting the links below.

Current Government Rules & Regulations

  • Ohio’s law that permits laypersons to receive and administer naloxone
  • Ohio’s Good Samaritan Law
  • Ohio’s law that provides immunity for minor drug possession (please note exclusions)
  • Ohio Board of Pharmacy Dispensing of Naloxone by a Pharmacist without a Prescription
  • Ohio’s authorization of bloodborne pathogen prevention/syringe service programs

If you’re in immediate danger, call 911.
In crisis? Call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or text “4HOPE” to 741741.
Are you ready to seek treatment? Get help now.