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MRSA & Antibiotic Resistance in Companion Animals
Dog and vet

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a newly emerging strain of a common microscopic germ that lives on the skin and nasal passages of humans and some animals.  It is present in about 1 percent of people in the United States.

MRSA can be a zoonotic infection (a disease that can be transmitted from animals to people).

A person can transfer the bacteria to their pets, who can then transfer the bacteria back to family members.

What are the signs and symptoms of MRSA infection?

Normally, when a person or animal is healthy, MRSA causes no significant illness.  However, following surgery or other illness, MRSA can cause severe or life threatening infections because the antibiotics normally used to fight the organism are no longer effective.

What are the roles of other animals in MRSA transmission?

Cat Cats can become infected with MRSA through contact with infected people or animals, contaminated environments or recent invasive procedures.
Dog Dogs can also become infected with MRSA through contact with infected people or animals, contaminated environments or recent invasive procedures.
  Other pets can become infected with MRSA and spread it to people or other animals.